How to Write, Finish, and Submit a Story in a Single Day

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Challenge: Write and Submit a Short Story in the Next 4 Hours

Here's the challenge: write a complete 3,000-word short story from idea to finished copy and submit it to a professional market within the next four hours. I've created this guide to help you succeed with the challenge. Have fun!

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How to Write While Traveling (And Keep Your Sanity)

Oregon Beach Ocean

Travel introduces you to new settings and people and makes writing a challenge. It's great for writers—you get so much more to write about—and scary if you are a stay-at-home introvert like me. Travel disrupts writing habits and routines, making it hard to get words written and meet goals. There are some things you can do to keep a basic foundation of your creative routine. Continue reading How to Write While Traveling (And Keep Your Sanity)

Learning About ConvertKit | The Stealth Writer

I'm new to marketing. My focus has always been on writing and publishing and unfortunately, without making much of an effort to make my work visible. I haven't used email marketing to reach out to readers and make those connections. Between working fulltime as a librarian and leading a busy creative life, I hadn't prioritized the marketing side of writing and that has hurt my writing career. Continue reading Learning About ConvertKit | The Stealth Writer

A Writer’s Introduction to Life Rolls

The view out my window shows gently falling snow and frosted fir trees. Pretty, so long as I'm sitting here looking out the window. Less so when I head out later to pick up my sick dog from the vet. What does this have to do with life rolls? What are life rolls? Continue Reading

Amazon Has All Your Eggs: Diversifying Cash Streams

Eggs with Amazon logo illustration cash streams

I didn't think about cash streams when I started writing. My basic understanding was that I'd write something, send it out, and I'd either get paid for it or not. Of course, this was back before the Web and before the current age of self-publishing (which has been the model in the past). I wasn't thinking about cash streams or about different ways I might use the copyright on that work. I also didn't consider how long I could continue to benefit from my intellectual property.

Today writers face many different decisions around cash streams and our intellectual property.

Amazon Has All Your Eggs

In the United States (not necessarily in other parts of the world) Amazon is a giant. This dominant market position leads writers to put everything in Amazon's basket by going exclusively with Kindle Select. This can work very well. With the integration of print into KDP, it is also easy to offer paperback copies. It offers promotional opportunities and inclusion in the Kindle Unlimited all-you-can-read e-book lending program. Paid by page reads, many writers find a lot of success this way by offering work that readers want.

I've also seen the reactions when Amazon changes how Kindle Unlimited works. A change to recommendations, to what gets paid, can mean that what worked before doesn't work for some writers. With everything in Amazon's basket, writers are vulnerable to such disruptions.

Going Wide

Another group of writers talks about the benefits of going wide to multiple stores and distributors. Whether going directly to Kobo or iTunes or using a service like Draft2Digital, these writers aim to reach as many readers as possible on an international scale. With enough success around the globe, Amazon's share of contributing to the writer's income drops. It still might make up the biggest piece of the pie but it becomes obvious that it isn't the whole pie.

This is where those other cash streams come into the picture. Say sales through Amazon makes up 60% of your income. Does it make sense to drop the other 40%? If you never had anything except Amazon sales it might not be obvious how much you're missing.

It's Not All E-Books

Intellectual property—copyrights you own—can provide an endless variety of income streams. The same story might sell in e-book, different print formats, audiobooks, in periodicals, anthologies, gift boxes, and other formats that you decide to produce. It can be translated into other languages. It can be adapted to other media, such as plays, films, or TV shows. It might become the basis for gaming titles across a variety of game genres. Comic books offer yet another take on your story. Merchandise is another possibility, through licensing or other avenues.

Think about a popular intellectual property, e.g., Star Wars or Game of Thrones. Ask yourself a question about those stories. Would they exist in the way they do if either George had published the story as an exclusive e-book on Amazon? (And yes, I realize that wasn't an option back then.)

What if your book is the ‘next [fill in the blank of your favorite title]'? Even if you don't think that your story has the potential to be the next whatever, there are still so many formats and opportunities available.

And yes, going exclusively with Kindle Select doesn't have to be forever. Except writers do sign exclusive deals all the time with major publishers that have far-ranging implications on how that writer makes money. Get an intellectual property attorney (not an agent) to look at any contract. Amazon is relatively benign in comparison to many publishing contracts. At least with Kindle Select, you can opt out in 90 days—with a publisher contract you might be lucky if you can opt out in 35 YEARS.

Lots of Eggs in Lots of Baskets

That's my strategy (though it isn't true at the moment). As I relaunch my titles and release new titles, I plan to go wide and hit as many formats as possible. I plan to have lots of titles available wherever readers can find them. Lots of eggs in lots of baskets. Some of the eggs might get broken. A basket might develop a hole in the bottom, but I'll have other income streams in place. I may even have a Kindle Select basket with targeted titles that are likely to be of interest to Kindle Unlimited readers. I want to experiment.

What About You?

Do you want Amazon, a publisher, or another vendor to have all your eggs? Share in the comments!

Self-Publish Like A (Badass) Tortoise

Tortoise shell pattern

I am relaunching my writing career this year, planning to move the dial from very few sales to the bestseller ranks. With twenty-four titles including new and previously published titles, I have a lot of work to do. It's easy to get frustrated that I'm not moving faster.

Take Tortoise Steps

I am embracing the tortoise approach to self-publishing. I'm picking my steps to make incremental progress. One thing at a time. Otherwise, it quickly gets too overwhelming.

Examples:

I have a bunch of previously published novels that I want to reissue. I published some under my name, others under pen names, but I plan to bring them back out under my name. I want to change my print-on-demand (POD) approach to move Amazon paperbacks over to the Kindle Direct Platform (KDP) from CreateSpace, move expanded distribution to IngramSpark, add hardcover editions via IngramSpark, and add large print editions on IngramSpark as well. That means I'll have four versions of each book across different formats and platforms.

Then there are e-book editions of each novel. I plan to go direct with KDP, Kobo, and run the rest through Draft2Digital.

The new editions of the books will have new covers (and different print formats require changes there too). Designing and illustrating my own work may not be the best approach from a strictly commercial view. I'm doing it because I love doing illustration work. The artwork hasn't been what I want—yet. I'm getting better and continue to learn.

I also plan to check the interiors to catch mistakes that might have been missed in previous editions.

Then beyond all of that are other things I want to do with the books, such as audiobook versions, other language editions, merchandising, and other projects around my work.

That doesn't even begin to tackle marketing, email lists, and promotion.

Whew!

That's too much! Rather than tackle all of that right now, I plan to take one step at a time. I can create new cover art and update the e-book. I can put the books back up that I took down from Kobo and Draft2Digital to try out Kindle Select. I can create KDP paperbacks even if I don't have the hardcover editions done yet. It doesn't all have to happen right now. The key is just taking those steps, one after another.

Forget the Rabbits!

I hear about writers putting out a book each month and other high-productivity efforts. That's great! I'm glad it works for them. I'd like to increase my production rate, but right now I plan to continue at a pace I can manage. That's okay too. As I relaunch my writing career I try to do something each day that will help me move it forward. Today I wrote ~1,500 words between the blog post, finishing one short story, and starting another story. I listened to podcasts to help me improve. I practiced drawing by creating the pattern for this entry's featured image.

Sounds like a pretty good day to me!

What Steps Are You Taking?

I'd love to hear what steps you're taking to move your creative practice forward! Share your thoughts in the comments.

The 5-Minute Guide to Goal Setting for Writers

WPM Gauge

Writing doesn't take much time. If you figure on a 1,000 words per hour pace, you can plan how much time you need to write a novel. If it's an 80,000-word novel—80 hours. At a 17 Words Per Minute (WPM) typing speed. You could cut the time in half simply by typing at a 34 WPM rate. The bigger question isn't how fast you can type. Without deliberate practice and focus on your typing speed it probably won't change much. The real question is when can you fit in the 80 hours, 40 hours, or 120 hours it will take to write your novel? That comes down to goal setting.

The Double-Edged Goal

Goals cut both ways. They can help you slash through distraction—and they can gut you when you fail to meet your targets. It gets even worse when you consider that most of us go through our days juggling dozens of different goals. If you're like me and have a career outside of writing, you'll have goals for that career. It may take up most of your time and energy. You may have goals around your family. Your health. And goals related to your creative practice. Often we don't think about all of these as goals. We might consider some to simply be tasks that need to be completed. A task might be mowing the lawn because it is the first sunny day we've had in weeks. You could even say that your goal is to have a lawn that looks good and the task of mowing is just one of the things that you do to reach that goal.

That's fine. Taking care of the lawn is one of those never-ending goals, same as taking care of your own health, and it is evaluated at any moment when you ask yourself if you are meeting the goal.

People also like to talk about projects as larger efforts that might contain many goals with related tasks. You might consider writing a novel a project. Whatever term you choose to use—your life is full of things to do.

External vs. Internal Goals

Your boss giving you an assignment is their way of accomplishing a goal (or several goals). In turn, you create goals based on that assignment, e.g. don't get fired for not getting the work done. Often we have less resistance when given external goals that are tied to “work.” We get up and go to work each day. We work to reach our goals as well as organizational goals.

Often it isn't the same with our creative practice. For one thing, it runs into other goals, ours and other's goals for us. I might want to spend the day writing and working on illustrations but I also need to do our taxes. I have other chores to do. My family also has goals for me. My son wants to play or code together. Our families understand that our jobs will take a great deal of our time. Naturally, they want to spend time with us when we're home. That's great! I definitely want to spend time with my family too, and I'm endlessly grateful that I have a family. I'm also fortunate in that they are also creative and artistic people. They have their own creative practices too.

Setting Our Goals For Our Creative Practice

With that in mind, I need to set realistic (and challenging) goals. I can't compare my productivity to someone else. What they're doing doesn't matter. I need to figure out what works for me. I might want to write a new novel every two weeks, spending 40 hours per week. That's not going to work with everything else in my life. Instead, I need to work back from what it will take to write a novel. If I need 80 hours to write the book, how much time can I spend on it each day?

Let's say that I figure I can manage a half-hour on my lunch breaks to work on the novel. That's about 500 words or 2,500 words during my work week. If I don't do any extra on the weekend it'll take 32 weeks to write the book. If I don't take days off I can finish it in 23 weeks. Figure that I'm bound to miss some days and call it 6 months to be safe. That gives me confidence that I can meet that goal.

Write a novel in 6 months by writing 500 words per day, 7 days per week. 

That also lets me use streak-tracking to help with my motivation on the book. I'll need to change parameters if I want to complete the book faster. Write more than 500 words (either by spending more time or increasing my speed). I need to keep my other goals in mind, things like blog posts, short stories, publishing, marketing, and illustration. Plus everything else in my life. I don't write in a void.

What About You?

What tips do you have for setting goals? How do you balance your career and creative practice? Share in the comments.

Resource List | Joanna Penn, The Creative Penn Podcast

Joanna PennLibrarians love resources. We collect them, catalog them, add them to lists, and enthusiastically share them. I'm no exception and this week I want to share The Creative Penn Podcast by Joanna Penn.

Podcast episodes are posted every Monday and include interviews, inspiration and information on writing and creativity, publishing options, book marketing and creative entrepreneurship.

Why I Dig This Podcast

The Creative Penn is smart, funny, and brings in many other voices for interviews. Joanna Penn's timeline to indie fame covers the past decade of her progress. She shares lessons learned in her podcast. I appreciate her transparency and willingness to share information with the audience. Although she is the author of many successful books, the podcast doesn't feel like a sales pitch for her books. She is (to use one of my son's favorite new words)—genuine. Simply scrolling through the list of episodes, I want to go back and catch up on ones I've missed.

Don't Envy—Learn

I started thinking about indie publishing around the same time as Joanna Penn. I remember seeing her name in various places, but she wasn't someone that I followed. Big mistake. Back in 2009, I started to get serious about my writing career but I wasn't sure about the indie route. I started trying a few things and began publishing much more material in 2010.

I made every mistake possible on the indie publishing side. I like being a librarian (and my son was still a baby at the time), so giving up my day job wasn't going to happen. It'd be easy to look at Joanna's timeline and feel envious. I don't. I find it incredibly inspiring and helpful. I started this blog to share my journey because it hasn't gone the way I wanted and I'm in the process of restarting my writing career while continuing to work a day job. Many of the writers I talk to are in that same place, balancing writing with a career and family.

The Creative Penn podcast offers so much for writers, whatever your goals. I highly recommend it.

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5 Reason Your Novel Doesn’t Matter—And Why That Is a Good Thing!

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Fear is a serial killer. Creativity, productivity, confidence—fear kills them all. And writers often fear many things. Rejection tops many lists in its various guises. We might rework a story or novel because on a deep level we feel it is not good enough. We develop rituals to handle the fear even if we fail to recognize that the real problem is that we are afraid.

Realizing that your novel (or story) doesn't matter will set you free to create without limits!

5. Your Novel Is One In a Million (Literally)

Each year human beings publish more books than we can count. Year after year. It has been going on for a very long time. The average American reads 12 books in a year. No matter how many books you write it will never be more than a drop in a very big bucket. That's great! One more reason not to stress about your book. Move on to the next.

4. You Novel Is A Game With No Takebacks

You can't take back a Superbowl. Your team played the best they could in that particular game. They don't get to go back and say, “Wait! We want to redo that play. If we—.” Nope. Game over. They can use what they learned playing that game to try and do better in the next game, but that game is done. The same thing is true with your novel. It's done. Move on and write the next book. Keep repeating that and learning.

3. Your Novel Is Only As Good As What It Taught You

Whether your novel makes you a million dollars or ten dollars (or puts you in the hole)—it doesn't matter. Really. Yes, it matters whether or not you can pay the bills. Which is better?

  • Writing and rewriting a book over and over because you feel your financial future hangs on it?
  • Writing several books in the same time period and learning from each?

If you have several books out your chances of paying the bills increases. There's no guarantee but you can't be sure obsessing over making one book perfect is going to result in increased earnings either. Judge the success of your book by what it teaches you, not by how much money it earns (and you need to take the long view on that too).

2.  Your Novel Is Not Your Story

Your novel doesn't matter because it is only a communication tool. It isn't the story. Think about it. Your writing is a process of encoding marks on the page to tell a story. Do a good job and the reader gets the story you wanted to tell. They experience what you tell them to experience. If you screw it up it's like picking up a call with a bad connection. The reader can't hear you, hangs up, and goes on with their day. So the call didn't go through, so what? Try to make the call again. Or call someone else. If you write a manuscript that doesn't work—pitch it! It doesn't matter. Write it again.

1. You Novel Doesn't Determine Your Future

You wrote a book. Great. Good on you. Now write another. And another. Have fun with it! I often hear people say that you need to treat writing as a job. Okay, I get that, but it doesn't sound fun. Think back to games you played as a kid, at the stories that you made up while you played. Play when you write your novel. Sure, you'll learn from it. Kids learn as they play. Play and learning are inextricably linked. Go play! Have fun. Don't take it so seriously. Then do it again!